Panda, Taiwan and China

Last month, I posted (HERE) about the two pandas “offered” by China to Taiwan, and I mentioned about two possibilities concerning the permit asked to let the pandas arriving in Taiwan:

  • Permits are asked but in that case it means that China acknowledges Taiwan is not part of China

  • No permit is asked and it means that China and Taiwan consider to be part of the same country

The two pandas arrived yesterday… And we officially know how the transfer was administratively handled.

In one hand, we have the “blue” political side celebrating and in other hand, we have the “green” opponents denouncing the fact that Taiwan was belittled and the “blue” denying that Taiwan’s status was belittled.

Among the 2 possibilities I mentioned before, it was the latter one: no permit was asked from CITES, (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora). It was considered as a transfer from city to city (Chengdu, Sichuan Province to Taipei)

Moreover, the CITES secretary, Juan Vasquez, said that in accordance with UN policy, the transport of the two pandas to Taiwan would be a matter of “internal or domestic trade” and as such does not need to be reported to CITES. (do I need to mention that on the website of CITES, Taiwan is “officially” mentioned as a province of China?)

And still, the “blue”side still insists that Taiwan status was not belittled?

Come on…

It is very clear that China, through the two pandas, attempt to “internalize” the Taiwan question.

Not only Taiwan status is belittled, but the pecuniary cost is not cheap: an investment about USD 10,000,000 in the Taipei zoo, plus a yearly maintenance cost of roughly USD 1,200,000.

Under the actual economic situation, I don’t think it was the most urgent expenses.

But of course, it is all about politics so the power in place is not apparently concerned…

But people are happy… even though the poor cannot even afford the zoo entrance ticket…

And for which kind of country the “blue”side is willing to sell Taiwan? To a country who had issued a memo instructing courts not to hear cases related to the collapsed schools, a lawsuit filed by a group of parents seeking compensation for the deaths of their children when their classrooms crumbled during a devastating earthquake in May.

While the Chinese government has vowed strict punishment for bad construction along with the investigation, there has so far been no public attempt to hold anyone accountable. 7 months after the earthquake… so think about it…

Maybe you think I am exaggerating about the “blue” side, and its willing to be considered as part of China.

On the yesterday issue of Taipei Times, we can read a story about the calendar offered as a gift by the Taoyuan County Council and signed by the speaker and vice speaker, all members of the KMT.

What’s the point? Simple: they printed Oct. 1 marked as National Day and July 1 as “Reunification Day.”

The national day of Taiwan is Oct. 10, not Oct. 1.

Oct. 1 is the national day of China.

So about July 1 marked as “reunification” day, what is that? They already planed that on July 1, Taiwan will be officially sold to China?

Do you need more to believe the final target of KMT?

Anyway, we do not need to be surprised from them.

KMT asked that the Taipei District Court judge who upheld the release of former president Chen Shui-bian without bail on Wednesday last week, should be replaced.

In a normal democratic country, the executive and legislative branches have no right to put pressure on the judiciary. See what happened to the Belgium government.

But obviously here, the “Party” is everything and it is even him who is talking to the Chinese side, party to party.

Back to the “old time”…

 

Mots clés Technorati : ,,,,,
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2 Responses

  1. gud one..

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